To do list of greatest minds: Leonardo da Vinci

If you have problem with your to do list or you are bored of listening about someone’s “To do” list –  just think of how would Leonardo da Vinci “To do” list would look like?

I assume something like: Finish the Mona LisaStart with painting The Last Supper ; Think about new project The Creation of AdamPaint the Vitruvian ManConceptualise flying machine, a tankconcentrated solar power, an adding machine and the double hull; Outline a rudimentary theory of plate tectonics; Paint an altarpiece for the Chapel of St. Bernard in the Palazzo Vecchio and, in March 1481, The Adoration of the Magi for the monks of San Donato a Scopeto; Create a silver lyre in the shape of a horse’s head; Prepare designs for a dome for Milan Cathedral.

Wow!

Believed it or not, he really had a to do list. A previously unseen page from Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks shows that even geniuses have to write down to-do lists with the tasks of the painter, sculptor and scientist’s list that are a little less ordinary.

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci was an Italian Renaissancepolymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist,cartographer, botanist and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. Leonardo has often been described as the archetype of the Renaissance Man, a man of “unquenchable curiosity” and “feverishly inventive imagination”. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived. According to art historian Helen Gardner, the scope and depth of his interests were without precedent and “his mind and personality seem to us superhuman, the man himself mysterious and remote”. Marco Rosci states that while there is much speculation about Leonardo, his vision of the world is essentially logical rather than mysterious, and that the empirical methods he employed were unusual for his time.

In the list, written around 1510, Leonardo reminds himself to obtain a skull, to get his books on anatomy bound, to observe the holes in the substance of the brain and describe the jaw of a crocodile.

Painstaking: For Leonardo da Vinci, packing in 1510, it was vital that he didn't leave home without a human skull of a scalpel as this bizarre 'to-do' list shows
Painstaking: For Leonardo da Vinci, packing in 1510, it was vital that he didn’t leave home without a human skull or a scalpel as this bizarre ‘to-do’ list shows

Leonardo is regarded as one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and was also a pioneering scientist

Brilliant: Italian painter Leonardo da Vinci is regarded as one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and was also a pioneering scientist. This engraving was created in the 19th century from a da Vinci self portrait

Dissection tools (detail from reverse of Leonardo's notebook page), from Leonardo da Vinci's notebook
Dissection tools (detail from reverse of Leonardo’s notebook page), from Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook

More practically, the artist also reminds himself to buy chalk, charcoal and paper. The list was a part of an exhibition of more than 80 pages from his notebooks at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, from May 4. Exhibition curator Martin Clayton said: ‘Like anyone about to undertake a journey, Leonardo is making a list of things to take with him. ‘Alongside everyday items such as shirts, stockings and a towel, he lists his anatomical tools such as forceps, a scalpel and a bone-saw.‘Soon afterwards we know that he was dissecting corpses in the medical school of the university of Pavia, to the south of Milan, and so this packing list may have been drawn up before a journey to Pavia. ‘This page is fascinating – Leonardo often covered the pages of his notebooks with observations about anatomy, but this page gives a really personal insight into Leonardo himself.’ Leonardo is regarded as one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and was also a pioneering scientist. The papers were probably bought by King Charles II and have been in the Royal Collection since around 1690.

A Da Vinci drawing forom 1511 of drawings of muscles of the shoulder and arm, and the bones of the foot
A Da Vinci drawing forom 1511 of drawings of muscles of the shoulder and arm, and the bones of the foot
Page from Leonardo da Vinci's notebook, including his 'to do' list
Page from Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook, including his ‘to do’ list

Source: Daily Mail;

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